New Teacher Tips – How to Deal With Discipline Problems

Teaching is hard, no matter which angle you view it. You will have difficult days and you will have easier days. But it all boils down to how you can use your power as a listener (one of our many roles as teachers) to help foster positive communication, which will offset discipline problems in the class by 99% once you do it routinely and you mean what you say.

Step 1. Echo. Listen to the person talking. As soon as s/he finishes, repeat what s/he has said. Try to use almost the exact words. Then ask one of the questions: Did I hear you correctly? Do you want to add something?

Step 2. Confirmation. Let the person know that you understand the important of what s/he just said. I can see that… I understand that you feel …

Step 3. Empathy. Try to see the other person’s side. By showing empathy you let the person know you really hear him or her. I feel that.. I understand…

Step 4. Make a Request. Ask the person what /she wants from you. Suggest what you feel you can do. Please tell me what you actually want.. What can I do?

When dealing with discipline problems, teachers need to also have emphatic listening skills to help them avoid confrontations with both parents and students. This skill goes beyond any sort of course you were probably ever taught at teacher’s college and is usually defined as a performance skill. in fact, teachers should rely much more on their performance skills for dealing with discipline problems than follow-throughs.