Why Effective Teachers Have Minimal Classroom Problems

Effective classroom teachers tend to have strengths in classroom management efforts. Teachers who know how to manage their classrooms create an effective environment that is conducive to educating students. The challenge for some teachers is knowing how to organize their classrooms so they have minimal behavior problems. In college, teachers are generally taught how to put together a discipline plan for their classrooms; this plan is supposed to resolve any behavior problems in their classrooms. We know that effective classrooms require more, and teachers who are successful end up creating a classroom environment that is caring, thought-provoking, challenging, and exciting. These classrooms serve as examples of how effective teachers run their classes.

One strategy these teachers use begins on the first day of school. Veteran teachers have learned that how they start the year off will determine the success of their classes for the entire school year. Initiating classroom procedures on the first day of school helps the teachers acclimate students to a well-managed classroom immediately. The sooner students can begin positive routines, the greater the chance that the teacher will run an effective classroom for the rest of the year. Moreover, student achievement is directly related to effective classroom management.

It is imperative for teachers to implement classroom procedures to which students should adhere at all times. These procedures serve as expectations for the students and should include what happens at the beginning of class, how to quiet the class, what to do if students need help, what kind of movement is allowed by students, and what happens at the end of class. Every successful classroom should have these few basic procedures. Additional important procedures include what students should do when they need to get supplies, turn in papers, respond to the fire alarm, behave when dismissed from class, and what to do when they are tardy or absent.

To help teachers become organized, they should identify a location within the room where they post classroom procedures. They should also provide a location within the room to post rules, schedules, and the calendar. Organized teachers also have assignments for the day posted in the same location for consistency, and some teachers require students to come into class and immediately begin working on their “do-now” assignments. This helps students get involved immediately, which sets the tone for the class.

Teachers can get support for their classroom procedures by sending a letter of introduction home with students and including a copy of the classroom procedures for the parents to review. This is a great way to start developing that all-important relationship with parents. Additional information to send to parents includes an academic action plan or syllabus for the semester. Students have a tendency to behave better when the teacher has developed a relationship with their parents.

In addition to classroom procedures, successful teachers have well-managed classrooms that are student centered; they are conducive to students’ collaboration and enable students to feel as if they are a part of the class. Student-centered classrooms generally have special seating arrangements so classmates can share throughout the day. In addition, student-centered classrooms provide students with options for projects and assignments. Students in these classrooms spend a lot of time working on group assignments, which helps students become confident in working with people. Student-centered classrooms also bring students closer together, which should lead to greater student achievement and fewer classroom problems. This strategy helps teachers successfully organize their classrooms, which is an excellent classroom management technique.

To add to the success of these classrooms, teachers should incorporate activities that are meaningful and engaging for their students. This will keep students interested, which is critical in successful classrooms. Students need to feel that they are part of the class and that the material they are learning is important. When students demonstrate that they understand these lessons and are invited to provide feedback about them, it contributes to the success of the class. Teachers can enhance such success by encouraging students to participate and celebrating their successes whenever possible. Some teachers celebrate with verbal praise, some with written acknowledgment, and some by posting students’ works throughout the classroom.

This entire process promotes efforts to establish positive teacher-student relationships. When students form close relationships with their teachers, they feel a sense of belonging, which is a critical factor in effective classroom management. In summary, teachers who effectively manage their classrooms demonstrate a positive attitude, treat students fairly, are caring, have high expectations for students, know students’ needs, are organized and prepared, and provide meaningful and engaging lessons.

New Teacher Tips on Dealing With Discipline Problems

Discipline problems is a fact of every new teacher’s life. The most important thing to remember is to avoid entering a panic mode and attempt to regain class control. Make the most of your time in the classroom by finding ways to deal with problems instead of becoming stressed by them. Discipline problems usually come as a threat to their ability to manage the classroom. But you as the new teacher there are a number of important ways to deal with discipline problems.

The first thing is to look at your lesson plan and incorporate the following tips:

1) Have a motivating lesson plan. Students usually act up when they are frustrated or bored. Keep the momentum in the classroom lively and energizing by providing engaging activities that the students will be motivated to do. The level of the activities should be challenging but no too difficult. If you are motivated to teach, your students will be too.

2) Have a back-up plan when activities do not go as planned. Some activities fall through for many reasons, and you’ll need some S.O.S. kits for those unpredictable moments.

3) Be flexible. Success with managing a classroom is dependent on how well you are adapt to new classroom situations as they pop up. Inevitably, new teachers need to think fast and change an activity or regroup students or deal with a problematic student after the lesson.

4) Keep updated on new methodologies and learning approaches and experiment with new activities. Some methodologies and approaches may not appeal to each and every class, and as a result, discipline problems may occur.

Practice these tips for preventing discipline problems and soon you’ll be making the most of your lesson planning and classroom management time, too.

New Teacher Tips – How to Deal With Discipline Problems

Teaching is hard, no matter which angle you view it. You will have difficult days and you will have easier days. But it all boils down to how you can use your power as a listener (one of our many roles as teachers) to help foster positive communication, which will offset discipline problems in the class by 99% once you do it routinely and you mean what you say.

Step 1. Echo. Listen to the person talking. As soon as s/he finishes, repeat what s/he has said. Try to use almost the exact words. Then ask one of the questions: Did I hear you correctly? Do you want to add something?

Step 2. Confirmation. Let the person know that you understand the important of what s/he just said. I can see that… I understand that you feel …

Step 3. Empathy. Try to see the other person’s side. By showing empathy you let the person know you really hear him or her. I feel that.. I understand…

Step 4. Make a Request. Ask the person what /she wants from you. Suggest what you feel you can do. Please tell me what you actually want.. What can I do?

When dealing with discipline problems, teachers need to also have emphatic listening skills to help them avoid confrontations with both parents and students. This skill goes beyond any sort of course you were probably ever taught at teacher’s college and is usually defined as a performance skill. in fact, teachers should rely much more on their performance skills for dealing with discipline problems than follow-throughs.