Tips for High School Teachers with ADHD Students: Presenting Your Lesson

Thank you to all of our professional educators who dedicate themselves to our children! We know how difficult it can be working with ADHD children, so here are your teacher tips for the week, brought to you by the ADHD Information Library and ADDinSchool.com. This is a sampling of over 500 classroom interventions for your use at http://www.ADDinSchool.com.

Here are some tips on presenting your lesson ADHD students. Remember, the best interventions are the ones that will help all of your students be more successful, not just the ADHD students.

Try to provide an outline with the key concepts or vocabulary prior to lesson presentation. The students can follow along and see the main concepts and terms as you present the lesson.

ADHD kids are easily bored, even by you. Try to increase the pace of lesson presentation. Resist the temptation to get sidetracked. Get excited about your lesson! And communicate your excitement to your students!

Include a variety of learning activities during each lesson. Use multi-sensory presentations, but screen audio?visual aids to be sure that distractions are kept to a minimum. For example, be sure interesting pictures and or sounds relate directly to the material to be learned. Many teachers are now using PowerPoint presentations or Astound presentations for their students with great effect.

Provide self-correcting materials for immediate feedback to the ADD ADHD student.

Use computer assisted instruction, both in terms of the student at a computer, and also in terms of presenting information via PowerPoint presentations.

Use cooperative learning activities, particularly those that assign each teen in a group a specific role or piece of information that must be shared with the group. Pair students to check work. Provide peer tutoring to help ADD ADHD student’s review concepts.

Let ADD ADHD students share recently learned concepts with struggling peers. Use peer tutoring whenever possible. Older students to help your attention deficit students, and perhaps allowing him to tutor a younger student.

The more exciting a subject is to an ADD ADHD students, the better he will learn.

Hopefully these will help the ADHD students in your classroom to be more successful. You can learn more about Attention Deficit Hyperactivity disorder at the ADHD Information Library.

Piano Teaching Tips For Highly Motivated Music Teachers

Are you a music teacher who intends to improve himself and gain professional growth? Well, read on as this blog aims to cite and identify some relevant and effective piano teaching tips – applicable to all music teachers out there.

Music education as well as learning various musical instruments has become more and more interesting, competitive and in-demand. Aside from arts, science and technology, music generally has turned out to be both the passion and the profession of most music teachers, musicians and music educators. With this, music teachers around the globe are motivated and inspired to learn new tricks, strategies and techniques more than to what they are used to. Here are some of the useful piano teaching tips that can make you both effective and efficient:

Time and stress management. Music teaching as well as teaching any other subjects requires time, effort and other resources. When you leave your classroom or private music studio, your work doesn’t stop. Sometimes you bring your work along with you at home – accomplishing unfinished businesses, unchecked and unrecorded activities, worksheets and quizzes. With these tedious tasks, you need to learn how to manage your time and organize your workloads. Proper time management draws you closer to a more successful and happy teacher life; thus, eliminating risks and chances of getting stressed out.

Continuous learning. Music teachers enhance their skills and achieve professional growth through various workshops, seminars and conferences. These series of training sessions help them in building enough self-confidence and self-esteem in teaching individuals from different ages with different lifestyles. With the kind of professional development they have, they have become fully-equipped with the right skills, knowledge and expertise. Also, they tend to update themselves with the latest piano teaching tips as well as the newest and most effective music teaching strategies.

Professionalism. This term has a wide array of meanings and significance. From one level to another, this needs continuous learning, dedication and passion. This also refers to good and reliable customer service, work ethics, and business integrity that are often grouped together and mixed up in other people’s minds as one big concept. Others see this as one’s personal commitment to anything that he does, thinks, says and feels

It is true that music teaching is one big responsibility and noble profession; thus, it requires much time, effort and resources. To be tagged as a professional, music teachers must learn how to handle different kinds of learners, situations and circumstances with all composure, character and fairness.

Consequently, music and piano teachers must willingly improve themselves for more effective comprehensive, innovative and interactive teaching strategies and techniques – making their students appreciate and love both learning music and music as a whole. As music educators, remember that you can inspire your students in many ways and touch their lives as well – more than just motivating and encouraging them to learn.

The above piano teaching tips allow many music teachers around the globe consider themselves professionals and have become worthy of respect, trust and appreciation at all times. So make yourselves equipped with the right weapons to make your students and parents realize that teaching is both your profession and passion – teaching music by heart.

New Teachers – Lecture Tips That Will Keep Students Interested

You’ve all seen the Charlie Brown episode where the teacher is lecturing and all the students hear is “wa wa wa wa wa wa.” We remember watching that as kids. Unfortunately, seeing this as kids taught us that this was what school was like. Now, as we are adult teachers, we are constantly afraid of becoming the teacher from Charlie Brown. Well, what if we could avoid this? What if we could use this knowledge to create inspiring and organized lectures using Best Practices? I have developed 6 tips for you to help you in creating fun and memorable lectures that will leave your students with long lasting knowledge.

1. Create an objective. We have heard this before from our administrators. Often times we hear this when the administrators come to observe us in the classroom. Write your objective on the board! Say it at the beginning of class! Say it at the end of class! Well, they’re right! By telling the students what they are to be learning and why they are learning, they are more apt to pay attention and way more apt to remember what you’re talking about. It will also help them when coming up with what they should actually be writing down.

2. Have your students do something productive. Your students should not be just sitting there. If you are engaged in best practices, your students should be doing something active with their learning while they are listening to your lecture. More often than not, this means that they will need to be taking notes. But give them structure. Maybe this meaning Cornell notes or maybe it’s powernotes. It’s your call!

3. Break it up. Break your lecture up into different segments. I would say no more than 4 or 5. This way, those who have difficulties processing long bits of information will be able to compartmentalize what you are telling them easier.

4. Separate the sections with different activities. Throughout your lecture, break up your talking by having the students do different activities. For example, have students turn to a near by partner and repeat the top 5 parts of the lecture they have heard so far. Doing this will help them to remember because they are actively participating.

5. Have them repeat through questioning. As you lecture, don’t just talk. Question your students. Question them on different background knowledge that they will know information about. Tapping into this will help them to succeed in acquiring new knowledge.

6. Wrap it up effectively. At the end of your lecture have your students do something with the information. Perhaps its a quick little quiz on the board. Perhaps they will write a paragraph summary.

Whatever you lecture about, make sure to follow these 6 tips to have your students remain actively engaged. This will increase their knowledge and participation. No Charlie Brown Effect here!

Rearranging Your Classroom – 3 Tips For Teachers at the Beginning of the School Year

Unless you are the most meticulous of teachers and have contacted past teachers, former landlords, parents, friends, and old librarians, chances are that you don’t really know your students on the first day of class. Sure, there are a few stalkers out there that already have the perfect seating chart in place, but most of us need at least a few days to gauge personalities, observe academic skills, and suffer through bad pairings. In addition, you might notice that that box or cabinet that you thought was in a prime location is really more of a nuisance than a help.

After some time period, even the best teacher will often need to make a few adjustments within his or her classroom. Here then are three tips to teachers in the first few weeks of school for making your classroom a better learning environment.

1) Mix up your seating chart

Decide whether you want kids in rows and columns, in 4 or 5 desk “tables”, or in some other formation. Should this kid be sitting next to (or even within spitting distance of) that kid? Can these two kids help each other if they are next to each other? Will these kids get high sniffing the Elmer’s glue sticks if they sit next to each other?

Typically, some combination of behavior and academics will determine seating arrangements, especially if you have the kids paired in any way. It’s OK to change your seating chart a few times, just don’t do it every day. Give a new combination at least a couple of days to make sure it’s not working before switching it again.

2) Moving furniture can free up space

If your teacher’s desk or a nondescript table is taking up space that would be better served somehow else, move it! Perhaps it could be behind a shelf or an overhead screen where a student desk could not go.

While it is usually better to get big-item furniture arrangement settled BEFORE school starts, there is no law in place saying it can’t be moved around midyear. Remember, the easier it is for you to move around the room, the easier it will be to help students and to keep them focused.

3) Keep those paths clear!

This follows directly from point number 2. Don’t paint yourself into a corner, or even into the center of the room, by arranging desks or furniture with no gaps or openings. You want to be able to walk around the room (from potential trouble spot to trouble spot) quickly and unhindered. If you use a “horseshoe” pattern, be sure to leave some spaces to get inside and outside the shoe easily. Otherwise, that horseshoe will NOT bring you any luck!

Remember that you might find yourself rearranging your classroom more than once this year. It’s OK to take stock every few months and think about how the setup is working for you.

No matter how often you move things around though, these three tips will always keep you on the right course.

Career Guidance Tips For Teachers

It may seem like a long time ago since you took up that one subject in Guidance and Counseling in college but waver not! There’s no need to take a refresher course for you to effectively guide your students towards the most rewarding career paths for them.

  1. Be an example of happiness and contentment. The only competition that can give financial rewards a run for its money is happiness. Remind your students everyday that career is not an issue of immediate monetary returns but of enduring returns. Seeing you smiling despite the stress of your work (and the delayed salary if you will) will inspire them to choose careers they will enjoy in the long run. It will also show them how, even if industry demands change, who they are and what gives them joy will remain rock-steady.
  2. Encourage self-reflection and self-discovery. With all the diversions and recreation students have, taking time off to think and reflect might be the last thing on their to-do list. You can help them by giving them a few minutes at homeroom to ponder on some questions like: “What do I like best about myself?” or “What do I want to do for the next five years?” If this seems too serious, use games like Icebreaker or Query.
  3. Let them express their plans and dreams. Many students, when asked what they want to do in life, just shrug and say, “I don’t know.” Perhaps they don’t, perhaps they do but haven’t really thought about it. Allowing them to express their dreams-no matter how far-out-promotes the value of thinking ahead and the skill of planning. Ask them to create an image of who they will be ten years from now and to write about what they have accomplished within ten years. This way, it will seem like they have already achieved what they desire.
  4. Commend a student’s strengths to him and to his peers. Giving praise where it is due certainly makes a difference. Notice the smallest victories in any field or aspect of life. Did someone submit an exceptional drawing or essay? Made friends with everyone? Fixed a broken chair? Receiving positive remarks about his/her output or attitude boosts self-esteem and encourages a student to pursue his/her best attributes. Making a student’s peers see your sign of approval makes them appreciate the person’s worth, creating a community where students are not forced to see academics as the only standard of worth.
  5. Introduce them to a variety of successful people. Provide them with role models of passion and good career choice, be it a college graduate or a high school dropout. It is common fare for students to meet college graduate bigwigs in their lessons. There are many of them after all as if to prove that college is the only way out of poverty. What is difficult is to convince people that college is not for everyone and is not the only option. If you namedrop successful celebrities and tycoons who didn’t go to college, they just might rethink the entire thing.
  6. Talk about a student’s best qualities and possible options to his/her parents. Hearing of their child’s passion and perseverance in something never fails to make parents proud of their children. Hearing of the best qualities of their child from a teacher enhances their understanding of their child and makes them more open to options other than theirs. Inform them of possibilities for their child and emphasize long-term rewards over immediate gains. For those students who are not apt for college education, dwell on the positive traits of the student so that parents will see the benefits of alternative options like technical-vocational careers.
  7. Organize a simple education and career directory. Because of the unavailability of organized information on education and career options, make a simple one for your homeroom class. You can put a simple list of college courses and technical-vocational specializations and their corresponding job or industry requirements. At the bottom of the list, include contact numbers for some colleges or universities and institutions that offer technical-vocational programs. You may also include local bureau or government agency hotlines.