New Teacher Tips – How to Deal With Discipline Problems

Teaching is hard, no matter which angle you view it. You will have difficult days and you will have easier days. But it all boils down to how you can use your power as a listener (one of our many roles as teachers) to help foster positive communication, which will offset discipline problems in the class by 99% once you do it routinely and you mean what you say.

Step 1. Echo. Listen to the person talking. As soon as s/he finishes, repeat what s/he has said. Try to use almost the exact words. Then ask one of the questions: Did I hear you correctly? Do you want to add something?

Step 2. Confirmation. Let the person know that you understand the important of what s/he just said. I can see that… I understand that you feel …

Step 3. Empathy. Try to see the other person’s side. By showing empathy you let the person know you really hear him or her. I feel that.. I understand…

Step 4. Make a Request. Ask the person what /she wants from you. Suggest what you feel you can do. Please tell me what you actually want.. What can I do?

When dealing with discipline problems, teachers need to also have emphatic listening skills to help them avoid confrontations with both parents and students. This skill goes beyond any sort of course you were probably ever taught at teacher’s college and is usually defined as a performance skill. in fact, teachers should rely much more on their performance skills for dealing with discipline problems than follow-throughs.

3 Legal Tips for Teaching Kids How to Drive

The American culture is full of all kinds of family traditions that are handed down from generation to generation. Sunday dinners, family reunions, summer camps, and secrete recipes are some of the most time-honored customs practiced around the country; but one of the most influential and memorable American customs is teaching your teenagers how to drive.

Unfortunately, letting your teenager get behind the wheel of a car may be illegal under certain circumstances, even if it’s just a few innocent laps in an empty parking lot. In fact, many parents and guardians are breaking the law when they first allow their child to drive, all the while, unaware that they are putting themselves at risk of being charged criminally. If your child is still too young, not legally permitted, and uninsured, you could face criminal charges if you allow them to drive.

So before you decide to teach your teenager how to drive, be sure you have all the information you need to stay legal while doing it. After all, it is a time that should be thoroughly enjoyed, and a memory that should be revered. Continue reading to learn 3 tips that will help you make your moment permissible under law.

1. Obtain Legal Driving Certification

If you are teaching your child how to drive before they take a drivers’ education course, be sure to get them legally licensed to drive. Under a certain age, a teenager can receive their Learners’ Permit, which allows them to legally drive as long as there is a licensed adult who is at least 25 years old (varies depending on state) in the vehicle with them at all times. The age limit and requirements for obtaining a learners’ permit varies from state to state. Check with your local DMV for information specific to your city of residence.

For example, In Indiana:

  • 15 year olds who are enrolled in a drivers’ education program can obtain a learner’s permit;
  • 16 year olds who are NOT enrolled in a drivers’ education program can obtain a learner’s permit;
  • Teenagers who are 16 years and 90 days old, and have completed a drivers’ education program, can obtain a probationary drivers’ license;
  • Teenagers who are 16 years and 270 days old, and have NOT completed a drivers’ education program, can obtain a probationary drivers’ license;
  • An 18 year-old can obtain a full unrestricted driver’s license.

Source: Indiana DMV

2. Get Insurance Coverage

After your teenager is permitted to driver under law, you still need to obtain proper insurance coverage through a valid automotive insurance provider. The policy must be active for it to be legal. Although many states do not require coverage during the learners’ permit phase, it is mandatory everywhere once a provisional license is obtained. Check with your local DMV for specific insurance requirements in your state.

3. Get Your Traffic Laws Straight

The driving laws have changed quite a bit since you learned how to drive, most likely anyway. So before you begin teaching your young one how to drive, be sure to brush up on the current traffic laws. Not only have traffic laws changed, but restrictions for certain types of driving licenses have too. Know all of this information so that you do not pass on inaccurate driving knowledge to your teen driver.

Teaching English Tips: How To Be A Successful Teacher

If you’re interested in moving abroad for a job teaching English, you’ll likely find that it’s quite different than being a teacher or tutor for native speakers. However, before you move to start your new career, consider brushing up on some tips to help you become a better teacher. These aren’t the only ways to become successful, but they can certainly help your students learn the language.

Tip #1: Speak Entirely In English

If you’ve ever tried to learn another language, you know that it can be difficult, especially if you’re trying to go back and forth between your new and native tongues. Studies have shown that immersion classrooms are more successful, mostly because students are forced to switch their brains over to the new language. If your students are just beginners, they may have problems following along so make sure that you write down any necessary information, such as homework assignments. Students may need to look up a few words in a translation dictionary before they truly understand, and having the instructions written down will help ensure that they can complete the assignment at home.

Tip #2: Encourage Everyone To Speak Up

Instructors aren’t the only ones who should be talking throughout the class. Students should feel free to speak to each other, without worrying about being mocked for making a mistake. Learning a new language is difficult and everyone needs to actually say the words in order to be effective in their new language! Don’t let a few outspoken students run the class though. Teachers should make an effort to call on each student at least once a session to ensure that everyone is progressing as they should.

Tip #3: Require That Students Write In English

Have you ever met someone who’s fluent in another language, but they can’t read or write it? These are often people whose families speak other languages, but they learn another in school. To help your students become successful in all parts of speech, make sure they write, as well as read and speak in the new language.

Tip #4: Make Teaching English Fun

Your class will learn better when they’re having fun, even if they’re adults. Nothing will put your class to sleep faster than a dry, boring lesson. Instead, use games and other teaching gimmicks to make the lesson enjoyable for yourself and your class. Pictionary and charades are especially fun, as well as spelling bees and 20 questions. If you notice that your class prefers certain games to others, try to adapt them for different lessons. Or, ask your students to come up with their own game to teach the class — when they’re directly involved in their own education, they’ll be more likely to be successful.

These aren’t the only ways teachers can be successful when they’re teaching English to non-native speakers, but they’re certainly a good start. If you can, connect with others who are teaching English and work together to share ideas and strategies that will help you — and your class — to be successful.

New Teacher Tips on Teaching ESL Students From Kenneth Beare’s ESL Guide

ESL guide for About.com, Kenneth Beare talks about his work as an ESL (English as a second language) teacher and educational writer.

Dorit: Kenneth, thanks so much for participating in today’s interview. What is your background in ESL?

Kenneth: I worked as an ESL teacher for 20 years. I started teaching in Germany in 1984 and continued in New York City for the New York Association teaching Russian immigrants of the former Soviet Union vocational English, as well as in Italy in the 90s.

For the past ten years I’ve been developing English language teaching materials for special courses administrative purposes. I haven’t been teaching for the past five years. I also work as a content creator and consultant for English language development products.

With regard to my work at About.com, I was lucky to be at the right place at the right time. Since 1997, I’ve developed thousands of pages of curriculum free of charge for ESL teachers and students to use.

Dorit: Your answer actually leads me to my next question. What are some of the primary needs and concerns of ESL students and teachers who visit your site?

Kenneth: 60-70% of the students want to improve their communicative skills in speaking. They also come with a more traditional mindset when it comes to learning English and love the traditional quizzes on a wide variety of topics.

The ESL teachers are using industry specific dialogues such as specific situational content at the dentist office which has become a huge hit. ready to go lesson plans are also very popular with teachers. I also have requests for EFL learning and teaching resources and I will point people to those resources.

Dorit: How do you see the development of online language teaching and learning?

Kenneth: I’ve been involved in a number of startups and I’m amazed by the lack of entrepreneurial spirit with regard to online language teaching. Teachers need to be aware of how their online personalities come across. You have to engage and help and create a relationship. That is where I see the future of online language training moving.

On the other hand, students expect teaching to be traditionally taught online. With regard to my online content development, I’m not sure if what I’m doing always makes sense pedagogically. We will be at a turning point ten years down the road as people grow into the technologies.

Dorit: Yes, it’s certainly is interesting food for thought. What are you thoughts about teaching needs common to both EFL and ESL teachers?

Kenneth: Often the meeting point between EFL and ESL is when teachers teach vocational materials involving shared materials and setting similar instructional goals. Language chunks and standard phrases, and particular jargon to various areas are all part of this development of global English. The cultural consideration of the status of English should also be taken into consideration as English is used more and more as a lingua franca. It is also important to take other issues into consideration such as needs analysis as students recognize their own particular learning goals. For example, are they learning English to successfully perform in a job?

The needs analysis is very important and that dictates your curriculum, your teaching purpose and finally, determines success.

Dorit: The same needs analysis is also important for teachers, right?

Kenneth: Yes. You need to have instructional objectives in order to achieve goals and in different cultural classrooms, teachers need to think about this. Adding materials and completely going off on your own shows on one hand that you are a motivated teacher but too often, teachers do not set appropriate cultural standards for the needs of their students. For example, do students need and want to learn about British culture in an EFL setting?

In high school, a lot of students wanted English learning material on a global level that opened itself to contextual communication such as discussing what is happening in Iraq now.

Dorit: Well we’re out of time for now but I’m sure your information will be very helpful to ESL and EFL teachers and students if it hasn’t been already. Well, thanks so much Kenneth for your time and participation in this interview. I always enjoy speaking to passionate teachers and educational writers like you.

Kenneth: Thank you, Dorit.

20 Tips And Tricks To Teach Mathematics At The Primary Level

The primary Math education is a key determinant and I must say the very foundation of the computational and analytical abilities a student requires for a strong secondary education. It is the very base on which secondary education is built on. This is why it is mandatory that the teaching techniques and methods we employ as teachers and educators be of such rich quality that the development of a child with respect to his mathematical abilities be wholesome, practical and balanced.

Being a Math teacher is not easy. It is usually the favourite of a few and the nemesis of many. It has been observed that children mostly try to escape doing Math work. While there is a section of students who absolutely love mathematics enough to pursue a career in it, many students live in fear of it. Today we are going to give our teachers some helpful tips and tricks to make teaching math an enjoyable and interesting experience not only for the kids.

20 Tips and Tricks to Teach Mathematics at the Primary Level

  1. Ambience plays a very significant role. It is your responsibility to see that a classroom is properly ventilated with ambient light.
  2. Ensure that Mathematics class is neither before lunch break (when children concentrate more on the Tiffin than studies) nor the last period where students wait more for the bell to ring (not to mention start feeling sleepy!) Keep Math class when the children are active and fresh.
  3. Cultivate the students’ interest in Mathematics by letting them know about the power, structure and scope of the subject.
  4. Hold the students’ attentions from the get go! Introduce the topics with some fun facts, figures or interesting trivia
  5. Chalk out the lesson plan effectively keeping time and content allotment in mind
  6. Use audio and visual aids wherever possible
  7. Draw on the board if required (especially, lessons like geometry, shapes and symmetry)
  8. Call students to work on the blackboard (engagement of every child is necessary and not just a select few!)
  9. Ask for a student’s opinions and thoughts on concepts and mathematical ideas.
  10. Give them time to discuss important concepts and study the text of the chapter too before taking on the problems themselves.
  11. Teach more than one way or approach to solve a problem.
  12. Give regular homework exercises making sure that the questions are a mixed batch of easy, medium and difficult) Children should not feel hopeless. Easy problem questions evoke interest.
  13. Reward them! Whenever students perform well, be generous and offer them an incentive to continue working harder.
  14. Let children enjoy Mathematics and not fear it.
  15. Instill in them the practice to do mental math.
  16. Also, never give a lot of homework. Children are already burdened with assignments to work at home in almost all school subjects, it is thus your duty to make sure that the homework you delegate to them is fair sized or little. (This trick will inculcate in them the motivation to complete math homework first)
  17. Present challenging questions to students so as to develop their analytical and deduction abilities
  18. Keep taking regular tests to cement knowledge.
  19. Teach at a consistent pace. Do not rush with any topic. Before proceeding, be confident that the students are clear with the prior topics.
  20. Play games to create a fun filled classroom teach and learning experience.